Supporting youth training for a more qualified sales force

Summary

Algeria is a large and rich country thanks to its oil & gas resources, however for most of the numerous youth, little hope of finding a job means despair for future. Private local & international companies build proximity distribution networks to traditional points of sales, but face difficulties to find skilled sales people. Many young people without diplomas would be interested in a formal sustainable job in sales.

10Oct.
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Reblogged from Danone Ecosystem:

Miftah Ennajah

In Algeria, people aged 18-30 whithout a diploma or a professional experience are the worst affected by the crisis in the employment market. At the same time, companies are struggling to recruit young people with sales training and long-term motivation: having access to qualified local sales people with a managed turn over is a major asset on a competitive market with high growth potential.

Danone Djurdjura joined up with the Algerian Chamber for Trade and Industry (CACI) and the Cevital group to create a sales school pilot project, aimed at young people aged 18 to 29 who are unemployed and unqualified. The aim? Long-term youth employability. As well as training them for a job,

our business partners offer students a first employment contract in the sales business

explains Guillaume Thureau, Project Manager at Danone Djurdjura.

The Miftah Ennajah School is a fantastic tool to accelerate the professional development of our sales teams.

Thus, the interest of multiplying this type of project is obvious, but co-building it requires a considerable investment from all the partners. Dealing with the challenges that arise, in terms of selecting candidates and running courses, makes it necessary to “combine our energies and provide new solutions”, says Mr Chaïb, Training Manager at the CACI.

With a success rate of 96% for the first promotion, the project creates new prospects in terms of reducing team turnover for the company, and offers a future and hope to many young people at the school. One of them, Djenet Fateh, can now think about his career plan:

I want to become a salesman (…). This is my chance to make a success of my life, find a home and get married one day.