New exhibition in London: “Cravings: can your food control you?”

Summary

A new exhibition at the London Science Museum, sponsored by Danone Ltd in the UK is exploring what drives our appetites, our desire for the food we like and our cravings. From 12 February 2015 to 1 January 2016, the exhibition “Cravings: can your food control you?” explores our relationship with food.

10Mar.
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This exhibition aims to educate and help people understand their bodies and their desires in terms of food. What happens when you’re hungry? Why is the desire to eat sugar sometimes so strong?

Adults and children need to understand the whole process, especially why junk food might be so addictive

Ling Lee, Head of Content for Cravings, said, ‘Through the latest scientific research on appetite, Cravings reveals the inner workings of our brain, gut brain and gut bacteria and – more importantly – how all three work together to regulate our eating habits. The exhibition is both a physical journey through the human body and an introspective one through the food experiences you have, and choices you make, all of which combine to make your appetite personal and unique.’

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They explore how food affects our body, brain and eating habits

The exhibition show an artificial gut whirring away and a real experiment on flavour perception. Thus visitors discover unconventional dining utensils designed by scientists and chefs to trick our sense of taste. Through personal stories, fascinating objects and cutting-edge science and technology, they explore how food affects our body, brain and eating habits. BBC News presents a short video on the exhibition.

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‘Danone is committed to bringing health through food and we have already worked with thousands of UK schools children on our outreach projects Eat Like a Champ and Danone Nations Cup. By sponsoring this fantastic exhibition we hope to help even more young people to make healthier choices’, said Adam Grant, General Manager of Danone Ltd.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BDUcOZA3-o

Photos © Jennie Hills/ Science Museum