Yogurt consumption is associated with a 40% lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the Spanish elderly population

Summary

A publication newly released in the ‘European Journal of Nutrition’ shows that yogurt consumption has health benefits for elderly people with type 2 diabetes.

11Mai.
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Type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, especially in the elderly population. T2D develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. T2D causes an increase in the level of glucose in the blood and can also deepens the risk for people to get a heart attack or stroke.

The study  revealed that a higher consumption of total low-fat dairy and total yogurt was inversely associated with T2D. 

Teams of researcher Andrés Díaz-López at IISPV Pere Virgili Health Research Institute Reus in Spain showed connections between yogurt consumption and the risk of getting type 2 diabetes in the Spanish elderly population. Published in February 2015, the study  revealed that a higher consumption of total low-fat dairy and total yogurt was inversely associated with T2D. 

After a median follow-up of 4.1 years, the conclusion of the study suggests that « healthy dietary pattern incorporating a high consumption of dairy products and particularly yogurt may be protective against T2D in older adults at high cardiovascular risk ». The study reveals also that yogurt as a snack reduces the risk of T2D by up to 45%. Yogurt could play an important role in helping elderly people prevent type 2 diabetes.

The publication confirms existing results  

The study was conducted with data from non-diabetic participants at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) from the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) cohort. Recruitment was held from October 2003 to January 2009. 7,447 participants were randomly assigned to three intervention groups: two Mediterranean diet groups (supplemented with either virgin olive oil or nuts) and a control low-fat diet group. ​

Only men aged 55–80 years and women aged 60–80 years were eligible. They needed to be free of cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline and meet at least one of the two following criteria: presence of T2D and/or three or more cardiovascular risk factors including family history of early onset CHD, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or overweight.

Connections between yogurt consumption and health are increasingly recognized and documented.

Connections between yogurt consumption and health are increasingly recognized and documented. This new publication strengthens the existing results and namely those of the two most recent studies. In the US, team researchers Chen et al (2014) showed that yogurt consumption was associated with a risk reduction of T2D of 17%. In the UK, team researchers O’Connor et al (2014) showed that yogurt consumption was associated the association is of 28% ».

These recent results confirm the value of working on metabolic diseases and the needs to identify the mechanisms of actions that are specific to yogurt.

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